Dancing with Nazis

Rammstein Du hasst – You Hate

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Du hasst / You hate

This video is a play on wedding vows. The following is an alternative interpretation of this video. Of course, it is not the only way the video can be interpreted. Rammstein designs their works to be ambiguous. If they delivered the following message unambiguously to a mass audience in Germany, they would be sitting in prison faster than you can say “Sehnsucht”.

It can be seen as an allegory for commitment to democratic Germany. As elsewhere in Rammstein’s performances (see “Mutter” and “Du riechst so gut”) the woman can be seen as being allegorical for democratic Germany. Rammstein wears masks in the beginning to hide their true face (feelings). The flames of revolution are also introduced into the video. The man on fire looks similar to a robed, burning Ku Klux Klansman.

The headlights of the car in the beginning merge to form an “H”. Notice: Who is driving (in control) at the start? The woman (democratic Germany) is in control.

A crucifix is hanging from the rearview mirror representing Christianity. Hitler thought that Christianity was a jewish religion introduced to Europe so that Jews could dominate the germanic peoples.

Allegorically, Germans are asked to be true to democracy. Rammstein provides an answer, “Nein!!” “You hate me” can be taken to mean that democratic Germany hates the people that reject it.

The man with the gun can be seen as those that intend to confront the forces of revolution. He fears them at first, but they take off their masks to reveal their true selves and he ends up going over to the other side and joining the revolutionaries, who are his true friends and allies.

The play on words of this song (You have / You hate) does not translate into English. Also, tenses are used differently in German and English which adds to the difficulty in translating the song as it sounds in German. When Rammstein says “Du hast” without finishing the sentence, it sounds like “You hate” in German. Then, when the sentence is completed as “Du hast mich gefragt…”, the meaning morphs into “You have asked me…”. Since Germans often, in normal speech, use the perfect tense as the past, the translation should be simply “You asked me” in English.

There is another play on words here with the verb “scheiden”, which means to “part” or “separate”. In the song they sing “bis der Tod euch scheidet” which means “until death do you part”, translating into the words of our traditional vows. However at one point they sing something that sounds like “bis zum Tod’ der Scheide”. “Scheide” has a vulgar meaning of “pussy” or “cunt”. Everytime they use the word “scheidet” it reminds you of the word “cunt” and in one of the final verses it sounds like they acutally use it that way in “until the death of the cunt”. It is translated so in the lyrics below.

In the final scene Rammstein turns their backs and walks away from the “cunt” and provides for a definitive end to her – the current democratic and non-agressive Germany.

You have / You hate

Lyrics to Du hasst / You hate in English

Du has(s)t – You have / You hate

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!

YOU!
You hate
You hate me

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!

(Interlude)

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!
You hate ME!!

You asked me

You asked me

You asked me and I said nothing

Will you, until death do you part,
be faithful to her always

No!!! No!!!

Will you, until death do you part,
be faithful to her always

No!!! No!!!

(Interlude)

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!

YOU!
You hate!
You hate me!
You hate ME!!

You asked me

You asked me

You asked me and I said nothing

Will you, until death do you part,
be faithful to her always

No!!! No!!!

Will you, until the death of the cunt,
love her, even in bad times.

No!!! No!!!

Will you, until death do you part,
be true…

No!!! No!!!

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